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Out with the new and in with the old after GSK trips up at vaccine plant

Problems with a new manufacturing process at the GlaxoSmithKline influenza vaccine plant in Canada caused some of the issues raised by regulators there, and so the U.K. drugmaker is reverting to its earlier process to get product to the market for the upcoming flu season.

German Merck to start work on new China plant

Merck KGaA will start construction next month on a plant to make diabetes drugs in China, a market it says is key to its future. The market is so important that the executive board of the German drugmaker held an event there to reiterate that point to Chinese officials.

GSK, J&J push for genetic engineering of opium

GlaxoSmithKline and Johnson & Johnson, which control most of the needed supplies for the industry, want authorities to approve genetic engineering so opium farming can be both expanded and made less susceptible to pests and so they can assure their customers they can keep up with demand.

FDA again warns that Texas compounder's products may not be sterile

The FDA continues its battle with a Dallax, TX compounding pharmacy which it says is not meeting sterility standards.

FedEx to fight charges it was key link in supply chain for illegal drugs

After its competitor UPS settled with U.S. authorities over accusations that it was a key link in the supply chain for Internet pharmacies, FedEx vowed to fight any charges that came its way. It will get the chance to do just that after the Justice Department filed charges against the international delivery service.  

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FiercePharma

Gilead Sciences' juggernaut, Sovaldi, keeps on rolling along despite the pushback from payers, politicians and health officials over the high price of the hepatitis C cure. It racked up another $3.5 billion sales in the second quarter, on top of the nearly $2.3 billion in the first, a sum that made it the fastest drug launch ever.

FierceMedicalDevices

Researchers are hoping to get into the clinic in the next three to 5 years with a self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumors. The idea behind the technology is to make cancer cells more identifiable when using magnetic resonance imaging screening.